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Internships

 

Internship opprotunities in forestry and urban forestry

An internship is a temporary placement with an employer that provides you with real work experience. There's no strict definition of an internship, so all internships will vary in duration, time of year and potential payment offered. If you're thinking of applying for an internship, make sure that you've checked what the particular opportunity you've applied for involves and find out as much as you can about the organisation you are applying to. 

If you are planning on applying for an apprenticeship make sure your CV is up to date and has been tailored to the position you are applying for and the organisation providing the internship. So do your research and remember your application will be one of a number they receive so you need to stand out! Remember many smaller forestry companies may not actively advertise internships but would welcome applications if there is a particular area in which you believe you could support a specific organisation.

When thinking of applying for an internship you should take into consideration the opportunities that can come from an internships over and above that of gaining workplace experience. Many internships are paid posts or have bursaries/funding attached to them. However, selecting an internship on the basis of the financial reward is often a mistake. Instead you should view the additional benefits that come from completing an internship;

 

  • Networking; Internships offer you the perfect opportunity to connect with professionals from with your chosen profession including potential future employees, colleagues or staff. You never know when the connections you make during an internship may cross your path in the future and what assistance they may provide in your future development.
  • Skills; Internships are often tailored to suit the skills and interests of the individual undertaking the placement. This allows you to build up real work based experience that can be invaluable on your CV when applying for jobs in the future. You may also develop new skills while undertaking an apprenticeship that will make you more employable within the sector in the future.
  • Knowledge; Working alongside professionals from within the forestry sector provides you with the opportunity to develop your person knowledge further. Take the opportunity to ask questions and ask for recommendations on ways you can build your own knowledge from those from within the industry who have the requisite expertise.
  • Employment; you should never take an internship with the assumption it will lead to a full time position. However, it is not uncommon for interns to be offered paid work ether at the end of their internship of later in their career. Leaving a good impression is the best way to be remembered when an organisation is thinking of taking on extra staff or have been asked for a recommendation.
  • Competition; Always remember the competition for jobs within the forestry sector is fierce and you will typically be competing against people with all the same if not more qualifications than you. These days a forestry degree is not enough to guarantee you a job and potential employers are looking for something extra on your CV. An internship with a recognised forestry organisation will often provide you with a way in at other forestry organisations.

 

Forestry Internship Opportunities

Royal Forestry Society

The RFS aims to inspire young people to consider a career in the forestry sector, and we are delighted to be able to offer intern placements.